Never Let Memory Go: A Book Review of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go

Even the best of readers might be put off by its plodding style—after all, Never Let Me Go does not seem to get off the ground as “normal” plots go. All we have is the voice of Kathy H., a sensitive narrator who addresses putative readers as her familiars, who takes us through the labyrinthine … More Never Let Memory Go: A Book Review of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go

A Review of A Hundred and One Days: A Baghdad Journal

Fresh from a literary coup with the publication of The Bookseller of Kabul in 2002 (for which she gained a big following and a bigger lawsuit), Åsne Seierstad returns to characteristic edge-of-the-seat reporting when she goes to Iraq to report on a country on the brink of disaster. Baghdad in the run up to the invasion by … More A Review of A Hundred and One Days: A Baghdad Journal

“Empire Fights Back”: Bombs, Burqa and The Bookseller of Kabul

The conquest of the earth, which mostly means the taking it away from those who have a different complexion or slightly flatter noses than ourselves, is not a pretty thing when you look into it too much. What redeems it is the idea only. An idea at the back of it; not a sentimental pretence … More “Empire Fights Back”: Bombs, Burqa and The Bookseller of Kabul

Children of the divide, redemption, and kite running: A Review of Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner

One reason why I eagerly picked up The Kite Runner, besides knowing it is on ALA’s 100 Most Challenged Books of the decade, was that the book had made it to Ateneo’s reading list for seniors in high school, and then, as soon as most of us parents had bought the book for our sons, … More Children of the divide, redemption, and kite running: A Review of Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner